Sunil the struggling student

Sunil the struggling student

A Moroccan arabic conversation guide

50,00 MAD
The book, along with patient teachers such as Fatima, Leilani's babysitter, and my students, will hopefully be my best bet. Speaking of students, it's worth mentioning that in typically ingenious fashion, the youth (and tech-savvy adults) here have adapted Darija for instant messaging and texting. Characters in the arabic alphabet have been replaced with the numbers 2,3,5 and 7. Goodnight, for example, may be transliterated as Layla S3aida.
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42846
They Talked about: Moroccan Arabic (sometimes called Darija) is the country's official language. A distinctive dialect of the worldwide Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), it is largely a spoken, rather than written, language. Newspapers and official documentation will therefore usually be written in MSA. Moroccan Arabic is constantly evolving, and includes words adapted from Spanish, English, and French. French is widely spoken throughout the country, and is the language of business, commerce, and, to a large degree, tourism. English is becoming a popular language to learn in universities, and is spoken frequently in heavily touristed areas. The regional languages of the country's Berbers are widely spoken in the Atlas mountains and central Morocco, although French and some English will be spoken in the more touristed areas. A Moroccan Arabic Conversation Guide by Mohamed Lamzoudi and Jacques Tronel (Librairie du Monde Accueil, Casablanca; www.limactuel.com) is a well-researched and easy-to-read phrasebook that is available at most airports in the country or via their website.
Plus d’information
Auteur Mohamed Lamzoudi
Editeur Libr.Monde Actuel
Discipline Langue Anglaise
ISBN 42846
Année d’édition 2008
Thème Langue Anglaise
Couverture Poche
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